Loose-fill asbestos insulation linked to increased risk of mesothelioma in men, study finds

13 Nov 2017 by under News

534px Australian Capital Territory in Australia zoom 100x100 Loose fill asbestos insulation linked to increased risk of mesothelioma in men, study findsThough asbestos is set for review by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the report likely won’t contain information about the risks of loose-fill asbestos already found in homes, the effects of which is all too familiar.

New research from The Australian National University shows the health impacts of loose-fill insulation Mr. Fluffy, found homes in the Australian capital of Canberra. The study concluded the overall risk of contracting mesothelioma was low—as it is a rare disease. However, researchers did find living in a house with loose-fill asbestos was associated with a 2.5 times increased risk of developing mesothelioma in men.

“The ACT Asbestos Health Study examined risks for people who had lived in a house with loose-fill asbestos, and we found that loose-fill asbestos insulation is very likely to be unsafe,” Dr. Rosemary Korda, the study’s lead author, said. “Our findings have important health, social, financial and legal implications for governments and communities in which asbestos has been used to insulate houses.”

The research examined data on more than a million people who lived in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) between 1983 and 2013. Of those, 17,248 people who had lived in an estimated 1,000 houses with loose-fill asbestos insulation over 30 years. In total, 285 current and former ACT residents were diagnosed with mesothelioma. Seven of those diagnosed had lived in a home with Mr. Fluffy insulation.

The two-year study was commissioned by the ACT Government, to improve understanding of the health risks associated with living in a house with loose-fill asbestos insulation.

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