Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Randy Pausch’

‘Last Lecture’ professer has passed away

25 Jul 2008 by under News

In the first days of writing this blog, I linked to a very inspirational video by , popularly called . Pausch, a 47-year-old Professor of Computer Science, Human-Computer Interaction, and Design at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania had been diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer, and created the lecture to inspire others to make the most of the time they have here on earth.

Based on the idea of “living your childhood dreams,” the lecture is a reflection on what would be most important to a person if they had to choose the last talk of their life – the things they would want to share with others.

Dr. Pausch passed away today, at the age of 47. He is survived by his wife, Jai, and their three children, Dylan, Logan and Chloe; his mother, Virginia Pausch of Columbia, Md.; and a sister, Tamara Mason of Lynchburg, Va.

Please take the time to watch this video. I hope that it inspires you to live your dreams.


The Last Lecture

28 Feb 2008 by under People, Video

Click on the link below to watch a powerful lecture, created by Dr. Randy Pausch, on the topic of living your childhood dreams. Dr. Pausch created the lecture as a reflection on what would be most important to a person if they had to choose the last talk of their life. What would they most want to share with others?

Randy is a 47-year-old Professor of Computer Science, Human-Computer Interaction, and Design at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In September 2006, he was diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic cancer. He pursued a very aggressive cancer treatment that included major surgery and experimental ; however in August of 2007 he was told that the cancer had metastasized to his liver and spleen. He then started palliative intended to extend his life as long as possible, which was then estimated to be three to six months. He remains vigorous and active six months later (February 2008.)

Although Randy’s cancer is not mesothelioma or asbestos-related, I thought his message could be inspiring and provide , as people diagnosed with mesothelioma are usually not expected to live for long, and most die within two years of their diagnosis.