Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Navy’

Asbestos suit filed by widow following U.S. veteran’s mesothelioma death

1 Feb 2016 by under Legal

Gavel Scales of Justice American flag square 100x100 Asbestos suit filed by widow following U.S. veterans mesothelioma deathA U.S. Navy veteran’s widow and executrix has filed suit against aerospace giant Corp., as well as several other manufacturers, accusing the companies of regularly exposing her husband to the dangerous responsible for his development of mesothelioma. He died as a result of the deadly cancer. Last week, Law360 reported the asbestos lawsuit had been removed to Pennsylvania federal court. (more…)


Jury finds asbestos products manufacturers liable for mesothelioma death, awards $7.2 million

3 Apr 2014 by under Legal, News

Gavel Scales of Justice American flag square 100x100 Jury finds asbestos products manufacturers liable for mesothelioma death, awards $7.2 millionA Philadelphia County jury found in favor of the family of Edward Merwitz, a former who died of mesothelioma at age 62. The lawsuit alleged Merwitz was exposed to -containing products while working on U.S. Navy ships between the years of 1965 and 1970. (more…)


Entertainment world loses famed columnist Archerd to mesothelioma

9 Sep 2009 by under Events, News, People

The entertainment world is mourning the passing of a legend, famed columnist Army Archerd, who passed away Tuesday at a , California,  hospital at age 87. Archerd, a U.S. Navy Veteran who served during World War II, died of mesothelioma. Archerd penned a “must read” gossip column for the Hollywood industry trade paper Daily Variety for more than 50 years.

According to a report by the Associated Press, it is believed Archerd contracted mesothelioma from exposure to asbestos during his military service, as asbestos was widely used to insulate vessels for decades. He began his journalism career with AP before moving into writing for the entertainment industry, and he was among the first journalists to be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

According to a story by ABC News/Reuters News Service, the entertainment writer was so influential in the industry that when he criticized some derogatory lyrics penned by Michael Jackson in the 1995 song “They Don’t Care About Us,” the “King of Pop” called Archerd personally to let him know he planned to re-record the song.

Archerd is survived by his wife, Selma, a son and two stepsons.


Lung cancer awareness takes big step forward

18 Aug 2009 by under Legal, News, Organizations

lca logo Lung cancer awareness takes big step forwardThis week the announced a big step forward in raising awareness and establishing real support for lung cancer research. The agency announced Senator Ben Nelson (D-NE) has agreed to cosponsor the Lung Cancer Mortality Reduction Act of 2009, S.332.

This important legislation authorizes a five-year program to reduce the mortality rate of lung cancer, which continues to be the number one cancer killer.

Even though mesothelioma is not technically classified as “lung cancer” because it affects the lining of the chest and lungs, and can also affect the lining of the abdomen and the heart, I am excited to see real progress being made in this area. Funding for research and treatment of lung cancer can only benefit victims of mesothelioma – pleural in particular, affecting the lungs – as well as other asbestos-related diseases that affect the lungs, such as abestosis, a severe scarring of the lungs.

The bill will require the Secretaries of Health and Human Services, Defense and Veterans Affairs to combine forces on a comprehensive, coordinated plan of action with funding authorized for five years to accomplish mortality reduction goals.

Of particular interest is a requirement in the bill directing the Secretaries of (DoD) and Veterans’ Affairs (VA) to implement an early detection and disease management program for military personnel who are at high risk of lung cancer because of exposure to carcinogens during active duty. As the mesothelioma community knows, many veterans, particularly those who served in the U.S. Navy, now suffer from mesothelioma as a result of the widespread use of asbestos on Navy vessels for years.

According to the LCA, the bill includes specific authorizations of $75,000,000 for certain National Institutes of Health (NIH) agencies in FY10 and authorizes such additional sums as may be necessary for all the cited agencies to accomplish the goal for FY2010 through FY2014.

Read more at the LCA web site.


LCA Chairman Coady has died

1 Jul 2008 by under News, People

coady 150x150 LCA Chairman Coady has diedI was very sad today to learn that Rear Admiral Phil Coady, (Ret.) passed away yesterday, June 30. Admiral Coady served as Chairman of the Board for the Lung Cancer Alliance, and was kind enough to share his story with this blog in April. A non-smoker, Coady was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer in 2005. The diagnosis spurred him to advocacy, particularly on behalf of Veterans.

Although Coady didn’t suffer from mesothelioma, he was very much aware of the risks posed by asbestos. His work during his time in the Navy very often put him in contact with the substance, he said, and seven of his friends died from mesothelioma since his retirement. In addition, for 10 years following his retirement, Coady worked as president of the Navy Mutual Aid Association, a non-profit veterans benefit group and life insurance service, where he said he saw what he thought was a disproportionate amount of lung cancer deaths.

When he began investigating lung cancer efforts, Adm. Coady was shocked at the relatively few dollars spent by the Veterans Administration and the U.S. Department of Defense, considering the number of veterans affected by the disease. He also was disappointed at the overall lack of funding for lung cancer in comparison to spending on other cancers, especially since lung cancer is the leading cancer killer.

He dedicated himself as Chairman of the Board for the Lung Cancer Alliance, fighting the battle for lung cancer awareness and funding under the organization’s motto “No More Excuses. No More Lung Cancer.” He led efforts in lobbying Congress to make lung cancer a national health priority.

Just last week, Coady saw some of the first fruits of his efforts, when Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Chuck Hagel (R-NE) introduced legislation in the U.S. Senate creating and authorizing at least $75 million for lung cancer research. This is the first ever multi-agency, comprehensive program targeted at reducing lung cancer mortality.

Perhaps the best memoriam Adm. Coady could receive is for supporters of lung cancer awareness and research to contact their U.S. Senators NOW and ask them to add their support to S. 3187, the Lung Cancer Mortality Reduction Act. Remember him and take action for those to come after him! You can view his obituary here.

Blessings to Adm. Coady’s family at this time of loss.


LCA lobbies – Part 3 – Personal Assistance

27 Mar 2008 by under Organizations, People

Personal assistance to those with

In addition to its lobbying efforts, the other main focus of the Lung Cancer Alliance is to provide care and counseling to patients diagnosed with lung cancer. A big part of this is to help patients find clinical trials for new medications.

“Right now, there are only about three, maybe four, drugs that are approved for treating lung cancer,” explains , U.S. Navy (Ret.), chairman of the board for the LCA. “Once you get past that, you’re on your own and there’s nothing else.”

The next step can be participation in a clinical trial testing new cancer-fighting drugs. The LCA has a screening process to help patients find a trial that fits their situation.

“It’s bewildering trying to figure out what’s a good trial for you and what you’re eligible for,” Coady said. “We ask patients questions about their progression, what they are willing to do, where they live, lots of other questions, and then we can process that information against a database of ongoing clinical trials and match a patient to where they are a good fit. It gives them another avenue to try something else, to keep hoping.”

They also provide patient support services like the Phone Buddy program, a peer-to-peer support network for people with lung cancer and their family members and caregivers, as well as an online forum where lung cancer survivors and their families can network with other people who are struggling with the illness.

Finally, LCA strives simply to raise awareness about lung cancer, and to promote early screening.

“Our goal is to save lives. Simple as that,” Coady said.

For more information about LCA and its programs, visit www.lungcanceralliance.org or call the Lung Cancer Information Line at 800-298-2436. Tap into the LCA Survivors Community online at http://lungcancer.clinicahealth.com. Call the Phone Buddy program at 800-298-2436.


LCA lobbies – Part 2 – the stigma of lung cancer

25 Mar 2008 by under Organizations, People

The stigma of lung cancer

coady1.thumbnail LCA lobbies   Part 2   the stigma of lung cancerRear Admiral Phil Coady, U.S. Navy (Ret.), now serving as chairman of the board for the Lung Cancer Alliance, was never a smoker, and was surprised at the reactions of friends, family and co-workers when he told them he had lung cancer. They said he was brave for sharing the true nature of his illness.

“With lung cancer, there’s a real stigma attached to it. People don’t mention it in obituaries. There’s this perception that people with lung cancer brought it on themselves. I was never a smoker. Twenty percent of the women with lung cancer who are coming down with it every year have never been smokers.”

The stigma tends to inhibit discussion of lung cancer, Coady says, which impacts funding for . If nobody is talking about it, the awareness just isn’t there, and it is treated as out of sight, out of mind. Meanwhile, lung cancer kills more people each year than breast, colon and prostate cancer combined. Ninety-two percent of people diagnosed with lung cancer die from the disease.

“I believe intently that the solution to lung cancer is making people aware that it is a public health problem and developing a public policy program. National priorities have not been adjusted to make this a national priority,” Coady says. “LCA’s first mission is to get before Congress to make this a national priority. Then, we go back to Congress and put some dollars behind it.

“The numbers we have all stated about the number of people who have died from lung cancer are compelling. It’s a half a million people every three years. There is no other cancer that comes close. But there’s almost no public funding.”

One current lobbying effort involves approaching state legislatures to gather support for an initiative that would donate 1 percent of tobacco tax revenue or tobacco liability settlements collected by state government for lung cancer research.

“Right now we’re using that money to build roads, schools, other infrastructure, but nothing to do with the cancer,” Coady said.

Next: Personal help for those with lung cancer


LCA lobbies for lung cancer funding, awareness

21 Mar 2008 by under Organizations, People

Operating under the tagline “No More Excuses. No More Lung Cancer,” the Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA), a relatively new organization based in Washington, D.C., is working to remove the sigma from lung cancer and secure significant funding to fight the deadliest form of cancer.

Chairman Coady’s story

coady.thumbnail LCA lobbies for lung cancer funding, awareness Leading the charge for the organization is Rear Admiral Phil Coady, (Ret.), who serves as chairman of the board of directors. A career Navy officer, Coady was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer in early 2005. He underwent surgery to remove the affected lobe and went through . In late 2005, the cancer recurred with metasteses to his bones. has been successful in slowing the advance of the cancer for the past two years, and Coady is fighting for other lung cancer survivors.

Although Coady doesn’t suffer from mesothelioma, he is very much aware of the risks posed by asbestos. His work during his time in the Navy very often put him in contact with the substance, he said, and seven of his friends died from mesothelioma since his retirement.

In addition, for 10 years following his retirement, Coady worked as president of the Navy Mutual Aid Association, a non-profit veterans benefit group and life insurance service, where he saw what he thought was a disproportionate amount of lung cancer deaths.

He notes that shipboard service in the Navy, particularly during the years he served, routinely involved exposure to asbestos, second hand smoke and other possible carcinogens. Veterans also were at risk from exposure to chemicals such as Agent Orange, sulfur mustard gas, and other battlefield combustion products.

“I had heavy exposure to asbestos in the Navy,” he says. “I spent a lot of my time as an engineer on ships. In the 1960s there were no precautions about asbestos that I recall at all. We tore out asbestos with hand tools. A dust mask might have been our most aggressive protection.”

With a family history of pulmonary fibrosis, a chronic scarring of the lungs, Coady always had his asbestos exposure in the back of his mind in relation to his health, and had regular CT scans to check for the disease, which he did eventually develop as a result of his exposure. Then, in 2005, the scans also showed lung cancer.

“Ironically, it was really my concern about asbestos that probably saved my life,” Coady said, crediting his regular screenings with catching his cancer early.

Next: The stigma of lung cancer